PDA

View Full Version : Jacket discussion...



neo9710
17 September 2011, 13:47
Hmm..I dont know even where to begin....Lets see...

Looks like my old trusty jacket has had enough. Im not a big clothes person. I wear things till they pretty much fall apart. A couple weeks ago, I was taking a carbine class and got caught in the rain and wound up DRENCHED. Water went right through the jacket. Recently, you can say that we have had a lot of rain. Last night was the kicker. Since the fall is approaching, I decided to go through my winter/fall stuff and pull it out to get ready for use. Well, its all in pretty poor shape and looks like Ive gained a few pounds here and there.:eek: My wife came downstairs when I was trying stuff on and gave me that funny look...So here I am asking about jackets..

What am I looking for in a jacket?

1) Waterproof or really water resistant
2) Windproof
3) Breathable
4) Abrasion resistant
5) Decent amount of pockets
6) NOT bulky

I pretty much take a jacket in the car with me pretty much all the time. I spend a lot of time outside and at night. Ive been looking at jackets such as TAD jackets (Stealth Hoodie ), Marmot (ROM jacket specifically) but cant seem to decide. I like the tactical style jackets because they always seem to fit my needs better..Below are the links I was looking at.. Originally, I was looking for a lined jacket. But, am I better off just layering up with a fleece and some sort of shell? Will I use this at work? Quite possible. Ill throw on my plate carrier in a heartbeat (SKD PIG - [:)];) I'm not a big fan of the stuff they issue us.

I stopped by REI and the salesman kept on trying to sell me jackets that appeared to be what I needed to use in the south pole.

http://www.tripleaughtdesign.com/App...alth-Hoodie-LT
http://www.o2gearshop.com/catalog/pr...c=1&zmap=24421
http://www.massif.com/integrated-tactical-jacket/

Wondering Beard
18 September 2011, 12:51
This might interest you.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ogjzWMLaADo&feature=player_embedded

Ranger325
20 September 2011, 08:59
How about Arc'teryx? I don't have any, but a lot of guys were wearing this stuff at a LAV class earlier in the year; besides, you can 'harness the power of a prehistoric bird'!!
Of course, Defoor's recommendation goes a long way.....................

rob_s
20 September 2011, 09:58
I've been in a similar boat for a couple of years now, except that I'm NOT interested in the tactical stuff and would really like to find something I can wear both with jeans and also with business casual (khakis and maybe a button up or a polo) and also not have to dump $400 on a jacket. While I'm sure they are worth it to some, they are unlikely to be used to their full extent by this South Florida resident.

Stickman
20 September 2011, 12:05
If you are looking at the best water proofing, the hard shells are going to be better for you. Grab a liner, and layer underneath. I've been up in the mountains with hard and soft shells, and the hard shells win out every time when the wind, rain, or snow is hitting hard.

Hatter
20 September 2011, 13:49
As a downhill skier in Wisconsin I've skied in some of the worst (snow, rain, and sub zero temps) conditions imaginable. Conditions in Utah are more favorable but I've skied my fair share of wind and snow there as well. To get the weather resistance without bulk you'll need a layer system like Stick recommends. The hard shell is key and Goretex is king. Thermal wicking base layers to keep you dry, a cotton layer to keep you warm and a softshell for added protection will give you a complete package.

http://www.backcountry.com has without a doubt the best customer service I've ever encountered and has a huge selection of winter gear. It isn't tactical gear by any means but the right gear will definitely last and the website will give you a good idea of what's available from the massive selection. The chat feature is great for the gear gurus as well.

Gray
20 September 2011, 22:09
From my ancient perspective, the middle atlantic states (lived there for quite while and traveled thoughout) do not get very cold, and except for maybe Mt Washington, one does not see the extremes that we get in the intermountain west and northern Rockies; it iis not uncommon to see minus 40f in January.

I have worn all types of the newer materials but I alway go back to this http://www.filson.com/products/double-mackinaw-cruiser.10041.html

Wool keeps warm wet or dry, it "breathes", it is fire resistant, and it may be the last coat you ever buy.

If you do not need that great of warmth, the single will do nicely http://www.filson.com/products/mackinaw-cruiser.10043.html

On the side of a mountain road at 0 dark:xx, at -20 waiting to clear a semi slide-off of the highway, or laying on your belly in snow for several hours with a long gun covering a barricaded idiot that you had to snowshoe to get to (been there, done both), this is old school, but so am I.

TehLlama
21 September 2011, 03:11
Whereas I'm from a desert state that does get occasional snow, but mostly it's to fend off wind and light rain. In my case, a simple soft shell (Mountain HardWear, Patagonia have been my choices) and a cheap fleece under it works fine for me. I've worn a cheap thin 5.11 fleece under my Patagonia MARS soft shell, with a shemagh wrapped around my neck to trap heat, and a simple issue beanie, and been able to comfortably shoot in a snowstorm. Comfortable being a relative term, but it worked.
I can stuff this entire setup, plus an IFAK, multitool, survival tin, and headlamp into a single MACS sack (or compress just the clothing parts down to 6"x6"x6" cube approximately) no problem, so I don't think it's all that bulky. Layers are the way to go, but asses how many seasons you want to use it for, and if you're more concerned with how it fares at the extreme worst conditions, or if you have that requirement met with something bulky, then maybe focus on having it be more ideal for more typical use. Since I have big ugly bulky jackets for when the weather really sucks, I went with a three layer setup that is optimal for normal use, but sub-par in torrential downpours and blizzards (which are rare for me). Hard shell might make more sense, and having two different sets of layering media (on thin light fleece, one thicker one) adds further versatility. The more athletic cuts make wearing two layers under the jacket nicer, but actually try it on to be sure.

Hmac
21 September 2011, 06:13
Although the reviews tend to be mixed, I've been very pleased with a 5.11 Sabre jacket I've had for about a year now. It's been fairly well-abused and has held up without problems. Zippers and seams work as new so far. I wear it with a fleece liner when it's cold. It's not at the level of TAD or Arct'ryx, but it's roughly 1/3 the cost.

neo9710
21 September 2011, 21:10
Whereas I'm from a desert state that does get occasional snow, but mostly it's to fend off wind and light rain. In my case, a simple soft shell (Mountain HardWear, Patagonia have been my choices) and a cheap fleece under it works fine for me. I've worn a cheap thin 5.11 fleece under my Patagonia MARS soft shell, with a shemagh wrapped around my neck to trap heat, and a simple issue beanie, and been able to comfortably shoot in a snowstorm. Comfortable being a relative term, but it worked.
I can stuff this entire setup, plus an IFAK, multitool, survival tin, and headlamp into a single MACS sack (or compress just the clothing parts down to 6"x6"x6" cube approximately) no problem, so I don't think it's all that bulky. Layers are the way to go, but asses how many seasons you want to use it for, and if you're more concerned with how it fares at the extreme worst conditions, or if you have that requirement met with something bulky, then maybe focus on having it be more ideal for more typical use. Since I have big ugly bulky jackets for when the weather really sucks, I went with a three layer setup that is optimal for normal use, but sub-par in torrential downpours and blizzards (which are rare for me). Hard shell might make more sense, and having two different sets of layering media (on thin light fleece, one thicker one) adds further versatility. The more athletic cuts make wearing two layers under the jacket nicer, but actually try it on to be sure.

Im pretty much on the same lines. Weather around here tends to change quickly but usually not to extreme conditions. Versatility is definitely what Im looking for - hence I was thinking the layered system. I pretty much have a pack with me everywhere I go...since I'm usually working all the time[crazy] ...So keeping a fleece isnt difficult. There is a Bass Pro shop in the area..going to give them a shout..

rob_s - everything that Ive looked at, just seem to not be made well and just has a name attached..One jacket I had the pocket came apart inside the jacket so it made them worthless..Or, they are plain just asking too much for what I am getting...

Thanks all for the suggestions!

Striker071
9 October 2011, 17:14
After looking around I bought the Massif Jacket from Us Cav. Needless to say it is a Jacket that is designed to be used in conjunction with body armor or a vest of some kind. Might be great for back packing. If you are looking for a jacket that has more than one role I think another might be a better choice. Weighting the CCW options for this jacket as well and may respond again later.

Good Luck... and happy hunting

Sak007
21 October 2011, 14:54
I own 4 different TAD Gear jackets and love them well worth the money .

d90king
30 October 2011, 10:05
For a fleece I really like my TAD Ranger (enough that I am going to get the LT version for layering)... For a softshell I really like the Arc'teryx Venta AR it is surprisingly warm as a stand alone but can also be used as an outer layer with a thin base. It is also very durable and lightweight. I also wear an Atom LT a lot but its only warm to 35-40 degrees. It is also a great jacket for layering because it is lightweight and thin.

Striker071
12 November 2011, 17:10
OK ... love my Massif Jacket light rain...wind temps down to just above freezing with a tee-shirt were no problem.... don't know about heavier wet weather.

brit
12 November 2011, 18:18
I found an article from REI that better explains how Rainwear works. http://www.rei.com/expertadvice/articles/rainwear+how+it+works.html

I'm also a fan of a light, breathable water resistant shell and a fleece inner layer. I think tehLlama has the right idea, keeping the heat in with a neck layer and a beanie is going to go a lot further than more fluff or layers.