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Thread: .308 Bullets?

  1. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Former11B View Post
    Yup, who cares if it’s not yawing at 100yds if it blew your can up?
    Touche'.

    This was definitely one of my hesitations about trying out those kinds of cheap bullets. That said I've seen numbers of people swearing by them. I figure it's worth it to try. If they are GTG it's cheap. At the first hint of a problem, no way I will risk my can.

  2. #17
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    I got both boxes of bullets in. So far so good.

    The Noslers seem like they are a quality product. I haven't shot any yet. Just this evening I did some case prep so I will start a bit of load development soon.

    On the cast bullets... I have to say that I am so far reasonably impressed. I opened a box and appearance wise they look pretty good. I haven't loaded any yet. One thing I did learn though is when reloading those kinds of bullets you have to add one extra step in your case prep. I just bought an expander die so hopefully that gets here soon.

    Basically you have to slightly flare the case mouth because cast bullets are slightly oversized. If you just try to seat em like a FMJ and skip the whole case mouth thing it will shear off all the coating and maybe even some lead. I guess that's something unique to cast bullets in a modern rifle.

    I will try to get some pics up soon. Those bullets actually exceeded my expectations so far. They are not powder coated. They have something called Hi Tek coating, whatever that is.

    http://hi-performancebulletcoatings....ercoat-powder/

  3. #18
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    About our Coatings

    Hi-Performance Bullet Coatings is bringinging cast bullets into the 21st century. The Hi-Tek Heat Set Supercoat was developed specifically for commercial bullet casters to provode reloaders with a cast bullet that didn't smoke and gum up reloading dies like a traditional wax lubed bullet. Properly applied the coating molecularly bonds to the lead, encasing the entire projectile in a protective shell that is self-lubricating. This proprietary coating contains no PTFE or Moly.

    What this means to you? No messy wax lubes that smoke, gums up your reloading dies or bullet feeders. Since the bullet is totally encapsulated, it also greatly reduces your exposure to lead. Cleaner hands, cleaner guns and cleaner air are all benefits of the Hi-Tek Supercoat.

    In use in it's native Australia for over 20 years. We introduced Hi-Tek Supercoat to the U.S. several years ago. It's been an overwhelming success by both commercial and home casters alike.

  4. #19
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    Do you use a VLD chamfering tool on the case mouths when seating jacketed bullets?

  5. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Former11B View Post
    Do you use a VLD chamfering tool on the case mouths when seating jacketed bullets?
    My normal routine is to resize and trim, deburr, and chamfer all my brass when I get it regardless if it's new or not. I am speaking specifically of rifle brass. When I do it once I don't always redo the trimming, deburring and chamfer every single time. Just depending on need I might trim and do all that stuff after every 3 or 4 firings. I have one of those Franklin Armory case prep machines so it's a little more easy to do.

    I went and prepped like 5000 never fired same head stamp Lake City brass a while back so I am not even close to through all that yet.

    Short answer, yes, but not every time depending on the situation. But no, not with a specific type of chamfer tool.

  6. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Former11B View Post
    Do you use a VLD chamfering tool on the case mouths when seating jacketed bullets?
    As far as those coated bullets go even a solid chamfer won't allow them to be seated without causing problems. The reason is (per a bunch of reading and looking at stuff online) cast bullets are slightly oversized from the actual for caliber standards. The bullets I bought were actually not .308. The actual measurements are .3085.

    There are many people who even like to cast their bullets even bigger than that. I've heard of people (online) casting bullets all the way up to .311 . There is some technical reason for this but I don't know what it is.

    I've also read that if you shoot bare lead it's extremely dirty. It can gum up the gas system, barrel, even the bolt face, not to mention potentially a suppressor. According to the manufacturer of the bullets I bought for my little test if you keep the coating intact during the reloading process it virtually, if not completely eliminates all that.

    Basically that means at least to give it a proper test I had to buy a $15 (including shipping) expander die that will bell out the case mouth a little bit.

    I am normally not a heavy crimper either but with those cast bullets I will make sure it's not damaging the coating when I do it.

  7. #22
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    I was just curious about the jacketed bullets and chamfering.

    I don’t crimp rifle bullets at all (not talking about straightwall cases like .45-70 or lever gun ammo) The neck tension by a properly set sizing die is plenty.

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