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  1. #1
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    Training for the "Experienced" Shooter

    The title should read, training for the over sixty bunch.

    Seriously, I have to many surgeries, plates, rods, both knees, and some other stuff, that just won't let me train properly, if I find someone running a weapons course.

    5 or 6 years ago, I was doing pretty good, could run, drop, shoot under cars and all other contortions that the instructor had us doing. Now I can only do one of those, and that's..... drop, and then I might not get up on my own

    Drawing and shooting speed is down at least 30 or 40% with handgun although I can still handle my AR's pretty well, retreating , if I had to, wouldn't be pretty or at least I'd be a pretty easy target.

    Has anyone here ever heard of a training program, book or video that covers adjustments to previous training routines, that would still keep you in the fight, even if you're a little slower. I'm quite sure if I had to drop, even with my knee and elbow pad, I'd be in some serious trouble. Hell, I tried on my new vest with the plates in, and I though my knees were going to buckle. Besides that, how's your day?

    FT
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  2. #2
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    I definitely feel y(our) pain. Following ...
    NRA Benefactor Member
    NRA Certified Instructor

    "I won't be wronged, I won't be insulted, and I won't be laid a hand on."
    John Wayne - "The Shootist"

  3. #3
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    Just sounds like you have lost some flexibility and strength through a bunch of injuries. Yoga and Tai chi are great for rebuilding flexibility. Local community centers will usually offer them for free. I would also add in some light strength training to begin rebuilding your strength. At first, jumping jacks, push ups, un weighted squats along with a daily walk starting with a mile while doing some deep breathing. Stretching is real important plus it aids in overall flexibility. I would say: get the body where it needs to be then start incorporating the weapons back in. Diet is another big one. What are you eating?
    The best way to survive a violent encounter is to be the one inflicting the most violence.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stone View Post
    Just sounds like you have lost some flexibility and strength through a bunch of injuries. Yoga and Tai chi are great for rebuilding flexibility. Local community centers will usually offer them for free. I would also add in some light strength training to begin rebuilding your strength. At first, jumping jacks, push ups, un weighted squats along with a daily walk starting with a mile while doing some deep breathing. Stretching is real important plus it aids in overall flexibility. I would say: get the body where it needs to be then start incorporating the weapons back in. Diet is another big one. What are you eating?
    We have two "club houses" in the Condo complex. One has an exercise room with "nautilus type" equip. I also own two Cannondale bicycles, mostly new. Last year I didn't ride or work out because I had a 15lb. weight limit, due to my vertebrae and ruptured disk(s). When it warms up, I'm going to try to slowly work to a useful regime.

    As far as diet, well it's not great, but I usually eat healthy.

    FT.
    Last edited by FortTom; 25 February 2019 at 15:41.
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  5. #5
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    FT, I know I'm not as old and beat up as you are, based on our conversations, but sometimes I may feel like it.... That said, I do have some injuries that came up the last couple years and feel your pain. I'm totally behind Stone's assertion. Find someone/someplace that can give GOOD advice on strength building (and flexibility is always good). Maybe that's a few appointments with a PT guy who can give you a program to go work on your own.

    Keep the faith, and don't worry about speed, but working some relative strength is key to off-setting injuries and being healthy.

  6. #6
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    "As far as diet, well it's not great, but I usually eat healthy." Remember that old saying "you are what you eat"? Well, it turns out that it was dead on the money. Repairing your body is as simple as just getting the right nutrients. Start simple with organic fruits and veges. Up your daily intake and swap out the junk for something your body really wants and needs. I would also focus on what your putting on and around your body as well. Like air fresheners, antipespirants, household cleaners ad infinitum. Most household's in the USA have around 200 or more toxic chemicals that are just toxic to the human body. A lot of times people start to feel better when they start to detoxify their homes. Trust me, people don't need 30 different cleaners to clean the house. I use organic dish soap and food grade hydrogen peroxide to do the whole house. Just getting your body in shape is only part of the equation.

    One quick example. Sweating is one of the best ways to detox the body. Scientifically proven, no doubts. There is a whole market out there that wants you to not do that(antiperspirants). Stopping your body from sweating is wrong on so many levels not to mention the toxic chemicals they use in their products to promote it. There is a whole industry that makes people sick then a whole nother industry that says they can fix it?

    Tip of the day: The FDA is hands down, THE MOST CORRUPT organization on the planet...
    Last edited by Stone; 24 February 2019 at 17:20.
    The best way to survive a violent encounter is to be the one inflicting the most violence.

  7. #7
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    Having been injured a number of times on duty, I can say that I've been looking for the right way to train myself.

    Pre-training, post-training and off-training-day stretching, strengthening is pretty important and I found that taking an active step in that direction has given me a very good "base" ability.

    Morning stretch 3 days a week, that's the first thing you do when you wake up for about 20-30 minutes. Little bit of yoga type (downward dog, etc), focusing on stretching your legs/arms and lower back, specifically.

    Get yourself an inversion table, a good one. In the beginning use it everyday for about two weeks. Then 3-5 times a day, specifically before and after any training, especially squats/BJJ.

    Squats. Low weight. Proper movements. Lots of reps. This will strengthen everything lower back and down pretty quickly. I use a wreck bag for this purpose. I do between 25-50 reps per set, until I get to 100 reps, regardless of sets. Then I do 50 lunges without the bag. This is about once or twice a week depending on how I feel.

    Hike and ruck. 20-40lb pack. 30lb is a good weight. At least an hour 3-5 times a week. Once a month a long 3-5 hour hike. This is will do wonders for, not just your cardio/stamina, but your overall body strength. Seriously this is vastly better for you than straight cardio.

    The goal of all of the above is to be able to 100 burpees straight through without stopping. Once you can do 100 burpees at a time, that should be your standardized test for yourself every month. Do it, write down the time and go on from there. All of this takes time but its a decent goal to get to.

    As far as shooting goes, you need to set similar goals and get there. I almost never do rolling around ground stuff, its once in a blue moon. The most active type of tactical stuff I do is FoF CQB and that's pretty good for what I need to do most. If you don't need to do CQB, the only reason you need to go to the range and/or do live fire is when you have to confirm your zero and/or test yourself on standards. That's it. I used to shoot a lot live fire but not anymore, very minimum I do in the area of 300:1 dryfire to live fire.

  8. #8
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    Thanks to all for the various suggestions. I'm also going to try and get on my bicycles if it ever warms up here again.

    FT
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