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  1. #1
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    Got a new Reloading Setup

    This is kind of a discussion and kind of a review so feel free to ask questions or add comments or whatever. My old press had been around for decades (literally). We used to reload on it when I was a kid even. It finally bit the dust so we got together and revamped our reloading setup. The images below are not mine but the give a representation of what I am talking about.

    What we got (so far) is a Redding T-7 turret press, an InLine Fabrication quick change Jr mount. I have also been playing around with some new (to me) dies, and yes they do make a huge difference.

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    My setup looks something like that except I don't have the aftermarket handle on it and my top plate where the stuff is actually mounted is removable.

    The mounting system is just flat out awesome. They come in a variety of heights, but I got the one that is 7 1/2 inches high and has quick change plates on it. Basically after the mount is screwed down to your bench you mount whatever you want on the plate(s) for whatever tool you want to use. It has a tongue on one end and a couple of screws on the other that tighten down with some wing nuts. The thing is rock solid.

    If you want to swap out a various item, just unscrew the two wing nuts pull it off and put the other thing on top and tighten two screws with your fingers. With mine you could drag the whole bench around the yard with a truck. It's VERY solid. You would screw up the bench but not that mount.

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    I have an RCBS priming tool, a Dillon swage tool, and I might get a vice or something (if needed) and I can just swap out the plates onto the base mount as needed in about a minute or less. It's a very awesome design and well worth it. I am very glad I helped make that choice.

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    The press in a word is very cool. It has some unique things to it. It is SOLID and HEAVY. You can change the turret heads out but I have not tried that yet. We are going a different route (for now) to see how it goes. Taking the head off is not as easy or fast as other systems but it's got almost no play in it at all. Overall I am extremely pleased.

    One thing we are doing is we found out early on that the threads on the turret head holes are all a little different. Slightly. By that I mean the thread pattern is the same but when they were machining the head they started the threads a quarter of a turn off from the other holes or whatever. Basically if you have your dies pre-set and locked into place you need to use the exact same turret hole for the specific die you are using from now on. It's either that or buy more turrets, which could be an option. We numbered the turret holes 1-7 and we will come up with a system to know which die goes in which hole for each caliber.

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    A really long time ago I bought a Forster die and just recently got around to using it. I started with the Lee dies but eventually all my rifle dies will be Forster.

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    I have a set just like in the picture and they are awesome. They need to be oriented just right (especially the micrometer die) but that's no big deal especially if you use the same turret hole for a given die. I could talk a lot about these dies. Definitely a massive improvement on a number of fronts. I got the dies (at first) for 300 Blackout because they were like a steal cheap and with that caliber there are so many different types of bullets it's just insane and with that I can zero the die and actually keep a log of my setting for various bullet types. Absolutely amazing.

    Also the way it grabs and seats the bullets is different than other dies. Many other dies grab on near the tip of the bullet, but the seating stem here comes down over the bullet more and centers it over the case mouth. Also the shell goes fully inside the die so it is supported during seating so you don't damage the bullet or have to try and cram in a bullet with excess force because of bad alignment. It keeps it all straight up and down.

    The resizing die is also on another level. People think dies are dies and SAAMI is SAAMI but not so. These are way more than I ever expected. Also another neat feature is if you get a stuck case you just unscrew the top portion and put a washer over the die stem and thread on a bolt that's about an inch tall and really fat. You just tighten it down until the expander is out of the case and you can tap out the case as needed. With Lee for example the expander and die stem are all one piece and they are not threaded so stuck cases can be a real pain in the ass. With Forster removing a stuck case is substantially easier without marring or damaging the die.

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    Lock rings. Initially I was in love with the Forster Lock Rings because they keep the die very flush to the turret head... but I don't like them as much anymore. I am going with Hornady. I spent a little while playing around setting things up and here are the differences.

    Forster Rings:

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    They are made out of aluminum. They work great if you are going to just set them and let them be in one place forever. After getting the depth and orientation of the die just right if you tighten down the ring to lock it you will never get it off the press. That metal gives and expands and is like it's just glued onto the press turret. That's a good thing if you are changing turrets but since we are going to try one turret and just do caliber changes from time to time [instead of swapping out the head] using those rings you basically have to almost start all over every time you do a caliber change. Not entirely, but there is an easier way.

    Here on the other hand are Hornady Lock Rings:

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    First off they are steel and second off they have wrench flats. You can tighten the dies down to the specific depth, tighten up the lock rings, then use a wrench to loosen or tighten them without having to loosen the ring itself up which would alter your die setting. With the Forster lock rings if they get tightened down too much or even a little bit you can't get them off by hand. With the Hornady it's no problem. Just use the same turret hole for the same die and tighten it up as needed either by hand or snug it with a crescent wrench and you're good to go. Caliber changes are about as easy as unscrewing a die and putting another one in it's place.

    It's also worth noting that at least for most of my stuff you can put two calibers in place at once if you really want to do so. Say you are loading 9mm and .45ACP, or you plan to do so, you can set the 9mm on one set of holes and the .45 dies on another set of holes and go from there.

    That's the basic set up. I have more things to say obviously, but this is all a serious upgrade in equipment.

  2. #2
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    Alamo sweet setup brother. The ILF mounts are spot on and are some of the most solid mounts I have ever used. I own 4 now
    “Fast is fine, But accuracy is final.” Wyatt Earp

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by DISCOM View Post
    Alamo sweet setup brother. The ILF mounts are spot on and are some of the most solid mounts I have ever used. I own 4 now
    4?! What are you doing with so many? I guess just dedicated one to each station. The quick change plates are definitely a space saver and allow a lot more organization.

    I'm extremely impressed by their products for sure.

    I think I could get hooked on gear for reloading :)

    Now I just need a Dillon progressive press so I can pump out pistol ammo by the bucket full.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by alamo5000 View Post
    4?! What are you doing with so many? I guess just dedicated one to each station. The quick change plates are definitely a space saver and allow a lot more organization.
    I have looked at the quick change plates and they seem nice but, I also think moving big presses like I have would not be such a wise thing.

    2- Dillon XL650
    1- RCBS RC IV old but a great press and, I do most of my seating on this one.
    1- Lyman T-Mag turret press. OK press IMO but, has to much movement. Currently trying a friends Redding T-7 like yours
    My 300 blackout subs are seated using a Wilson inline micrometer seating die and a arbor press.

    If you end up getting a Dillon they are great presses and easy to upgrade.

    I have had friends Redding T-7 since last Monday and may soon ditch the T-Mag. Much better press.
    Last edited by DISCOM; 15 June 2019 at 21:06.
    “Fast is fine, But accuracy is final.” Wyatt Earp

  5. #5
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    I've been eyeing that RCBS Summit press. That one for forming and resizing brass, and use some Forster rifle dies. That would be awesome.

    Not sure if you watch but that guy on GavinToob did tons of tests and that one had the best performance of all single stage presses.

    I also like the Forster Coax but odds are I won't need so many presses.

    They make little wall mounts for the units that are not in use (for the QD system) so those will be put in the mix eventually. $20 bucks, why not.

    Moving the press around is not so bad but that T7 is heavy as hell. It must weigh 30 pounds. Just don't drop it on your foot.

    If I had more space I would probably go with a separate station for each thing but as is it has made a TON of room on the bench top.

    With that swappable top plate you could have a whole reloading set up in an apartment even.

    I do have to say that I'm very pleased with the press so far. I've never really played with a progressive press before so I have to see one in person and get some me time with it before shelling out that kind of coin.

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