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  1. #331
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    Good podcast worth a listen... Non-related: Check previous page for suggestions

    https://www.podbean.com/media/share/...source=w_share
    The best way to survive a violent encounter is to be the one inflicting the most violence.

  2. #332
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    I did a little bit of research (finally) on TCFF from a fundamentalist perspective. Let me know if anyone is interested in it and I will create a post about it.

  3. #333
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    Why hold back ..spill it.. :)

  4. #334
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    Quote Originally Posted by mustangfreek View Post
    Why hold back ..spill it.. :)
    OK. I will try to keep in as brief as I can. Which means it's going to be a long post. LOL

    TCFF markets itself as a "green energy" company but that is kind of a loose term.

    The basic stuff to knowing the 'gist' is knowing how oil is refined. When oil comes out of the ground they basically put it in big boilers and bring it up to temperature slowly. The light stuff goes first, then the next, and on and on. They capture each individual distillate for further purification and to blend them later into all sorts of stuff. Jet fuel, plastics, gasoline, diesel, etc are all made from various combinations of distillates.

    When they get down to the very bottom of the barrel though there is stuff left over that ultimately looks like tar. It's super thick and needs to be heated so that it can be viscous enough to flow. This left over stuff is called 'residual fuel oil' (there are numerous types of this because there are lots of different grades and weights of crude out there).

    Typically this residual fuel oil is used in a few different applications. Some of it has the last little bit of energy stripped out of it and then the left overs of the left overs are used to pave roads or whatever. However one of the biggest uses of residual fuel oil historically has been it fueled ships. Really really big ships. It was the primary fuel source after they stopped using coal. Everything from oil tankers onward was fueled by this type of stuff, that is until last year (2020).

    Way back like a decade or two ago they planned out how to shift ocean shipping to cleaner burning distillate based fuels. The primary driver was to reduce pollution. Ships had the choice to either retrofit with expensive scrubber technology that cleans the exhaust or to change over wholesale to the new fuels. It went off basically without a hitch. IMO 2020 was literally the biggest energy turn over in our lifetimes. It was equally on par with changing from coal to other types of fuel and in many ways even much much bigger of a change.

    The thing is, there is still a lot of residual fuel oil (the leftovers) from oil refining out there. There is a mad dash to figure out what to do with all that stuff but it's starting to take shape more what direction things are going.

    Some ships still burn it for fuel but now they are required to have scrubber technology to clean the exhaust. Right now maybe 10-15% of ocean going vessels use this oil. The rest are using the new low sulfur distillate fuels.

    What TCFF does is they created a unique additive to these residual fuel oils that loosens it up and allows it to bond with water. What they do is mix those chemicals in and then slowly blend in water to create about an 80% fuel/20% water emulsion that is a direct substitute for at the pump diesel fuel.

    First benefit is the base fuel is cheap. Really cheap now. Then they can actually increase metric volume by 20% with the addition of water to form that emulsion fuel. Emulsion is basically a cooking technique where you can mix oil and water. If you've ever had eggs benedict the sauce is an emulsion. Only this stuff you can directly substitute in any diesel engine without modification.

    Right now a gallon of that emulsion fuel has an at the pump price tag of around $1.80. So if you pulled up a big diesel 4wd to the pump that's what you would pay. That's about $1 to $1.30 cheaper than traditional diesel. Those two fuels (diesel and emulsion fuel) can be mixed and used interchangeably without any modification. The emulsion fuel however burns about 35% cleaner than traditional diesel (hence the 'green' label).

    On the surface it looks great. But there is a lot more going on here. First off they drove those residual fuels off the ocean, but now we have to ask what happens to it now? The basic answer is it will be used for onshore electricity generation. They are proactively retrofitting or outright building new electricity generation that has built in scrubber technology. This basically captures the exhaust and very efficiently removes 99% of the bad stuff for later disposal. Scrubber technology isn't cheap but when you space it out over 20-30 years it's very viable.

    Basically these residual fuels will be moved from being primarily on the oceans to primarily being on-shore. That shift is already well underway. The core material that TCFF is using for it's primary product isn't going to go unused. And that new electric generation can just burn it straight and scrub the exhaust cheaper than just buying some other type of clean fuels.

    Also my personal estimation is that the oil majors will definitely NOT enable someone that will go undercut them by over a dollar per gallon. They are extremely unlikely to play ball for that to happen for any significant period of time. How and where those residual fuel oils are brokered won't be in the junk yard model going forward.

    Where I DO see that kind of emulsion technology being of tremendous use is to license it to oil majors and other refineries. That will allow them to use even more of the barrel than they do now. Every bit more they use is that much more profit, especially when you are talking about massive volume amounts.

    Where I see that technology having a particular impact is for them to blend it as they do but then mix it back in with traditional diesel as an additive or sorts. Sort of like how ethanol is done now with unleaded gasoline. The emulsion fuels in the current price structure are very much cheaper, and they have the benefit of having a 20% water content as well as can be blended, mixed, or used interchangeably with regular diesel.

    In the longer-ish terms they might make a lot of inroads in some smaller markets without massive oil major influence but overall I personally think they will get squeezed big time. Unless they figure out how to incorporate themselves in with the oil majors for that 'additive model' I think they will remain a niche player. At the end of the day their product is STILL a fossil fuel and is still 100% dependent on current oil refining.

  5. #335
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    I can go as deep as you want to go into those various aspects of things but I tried to keep it top level down overview-ish. Ask away with any questions.

  6. #336
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    ELECF- Green energy royalty company. DYODD!!
    The best way to survive a violent encounter is to be the one inflicting the most violence.

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