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  1. #1
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    Ammunition Backlog

    I am not sure who has seen this yet but Vista Outdoors said they have over a $1 billion dollar backlog for ammo.


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  2. #2
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    For one place I've never even heard of....

    I'm neber goona git no more ammo!!
    There's no "Team" in F**K YOU!

  3. #3
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    If you wait, I feel like you can still find ammo. However, it's going to be expensive.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by UWone77 View Post
    If you wait, I feel like you can still find ammo. However, it's going to be expensive.
    When everything eventually dies down I think a lot of retailers will be stuck with high dollar ammo.

    The last couple of times there was a big run people bought forward delivery of ammo (pay now, delivered later) and they wound up stuck with a lot of inventory that they were upside down on.

    That said I recall not too long ago when CCI was giving you $200 cash back for buying primers. I should have jumped on that but it's ok. If they get all the materials for primers and wind up sitting on inventory we could see deals (in the future ) at some point.

    No telling when that will be, if ever.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by alamo5000 View Post
    When everything eventually dies down I think a lot of retailers will be stuck with high dollar ammo.

    The last couple of times there was a big run people bought forward delivery of ammo (pay now, delivered later) and they wound up stuck with a lot of inventory that they were upside down on.

    That said I recall not too long ago when CCI was giving you $200 cash back for buying primers. I should have jumped on that but it's ok. If they get all the materials for primers and wind up sitting on inventory we could see deals (in the future ) at some point.

    No telling when that will be, if ever.

    With my current inventory of reloading supplies (mainly primers since I can still get bullets and have a good bit of powder) I’ve probably got one more competition season in my future and then I’ll just be sitting on what I have left saving it if I can’t replace it.

    I hope in six months I don’t look back at 1000 primers for $100-$120 as the “good ole days”

  6. #6
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    I hope that by this time next year you'll be back to reloading your heart out. I'm hoping for another Freedom Munitions. Man, that was good plinking ammo, and the better stuff made decent carry ammo for cheap!
    There's no "Team" in F**K YOU!

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Joelski View Post
    I hope that by this time next year you'll be back to reloading your heart out.
    I'm not a heavy shooter. Since I can shoot at home I typically will shoot 3 or 4 mags once or twice a week, except rimfire which might be several hundred rounds per week. Sometimes I rotate whst i am shooting too.

    I am more of a believer in consistency vs quantity. Some people will go shoot 1000 rounds in a day then not shoot again for 4 or 5 months. That's not really my way to go about it.

    On my schedule I can load for probably at least two years with just what I have on hand, probably more than that. Two years is a conservative guess. I might have to buy more projectiles in a year from now but that's ok.

    In the future though I plan to double my stash of primers if not triple them.

    I'm pretty flush for now but I still don't think I should go buck wild shooting more until I can get more supplies as a bigger cushion.

  8. #8
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    It’s only getting worse..seen a statistic the other day..something like 32 million New gun owners in 2020.

    So say they want a 100 rds each..I know newbie numbers but..that equals a demand for 3.2 billion rounds.

    Then the other 300 million gun owners...
    Holy hell..

    I never thought I’d see primers going for a $100 plus for a brick of 1k, which are usually 30’ish..times are crazy

  9. #9
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    Along with people on many boards saying online ammo sales are not available anymore at basspro or cabelas..Possibly sportsmen’s too soon as they just bought them out.

    I just went and tried to order some in stock 12 guage and it says not available to checkout when I try too.

    This is gonna kill so much of the industry..as there calling for complete ban of online ammo and parts sales

  10. #10
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    Thats funny because that's what started the first revolutionary war and since we are on the cusp of a second, this will be the match to light the powder keg. The second march on the capital will not be a peaceful one... DSOL! Descendants of the Sons of Liberty
    Last edited by Stone; 9 January 2021 at 10:24.
    The best way to survive a violent encounter is to be the one inflicting the most violence.

  11. #11
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    "Many today don’t realize that we are facing the same sort of tactics by our own Federal government that our forefathers faced from the British just prior to the War for Independence. In fact, I’ll venture to guess that most people never were taught in school what follows in this article. That’s right, gun control is nothing new now, nor was it even new in the twentieth century. It was very much alive in the eighteenth century. So when someone comes along telling you “the founding fathers wouldn’t have envisioned this or that” with regards to arms, just remind them of what they faced during their lifetimes when the primary weapons were single shot muskets and cannons.

    Following the events of December 16, 1773 in which the Sons of Liberty in Boston made a political protest of the tax policy of the British government and the East India Company that controlled all the tea that was imported into the colonies in Boston Harbor. Disguised as Indians, a group numbering anywhere from 30 to 130 men dumped 342 chests of tea into the sea over the course of three hours.

    As a result of this protest, Parliament, with the direct encouragement of King George III, passed the Coercive Acts, or as they were properly known the Restraining Acts, in 1774.

    Though Parliament was warned by men like Edmund Burke and Lord Chatham that such legislation would not be wise and would only provoke the colonists more, they failed to listen to reason.

    Patriots that heard of the Acts determined that they would fight and die rather than see such laws enforced upon them by the British Army. The Patriots of Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, resolved: “That in the event of Great Britain attempting to force unjust laws upon us by the strength of arms, our cause we leave to heaven and our rifles.” Interestingly enough, a South Carolina newspaper essay, which was reprinted in Virginia at the time, recorded that any law that required the military to enforce it was “necessarily illegitimate,” according to David B. Kopel.

    In Massachusetts, the Royal Governor, General Thomas Gage, forbid town meetings from taking place more than once a year. So when an illegal meeting was taking place in Salem, he sent in the British Redcoats to break it up. They were met with 3,000 armed Americans and they retreated. Interestingly enough, Gage’s aide, John Andrews, said that anyone in the area that was 16 years or older owned a firearm and had gunpowder. If you were wondering, yes this is where the issue of the First Amendment came from and where “town hall meetings” originated from. Let’s just say in Massachusetts, it was “getting real.”

    The British realized that they could not control the people with only 2,000 troops in Boston. So what did they do? They sought to eliminate the people’s ability to firearms and gun powder.

    Remember, at one time it was law in the colonies for militiamen to own their own firearms and have a minimum quantity of gunpowder on hand, though all could not afford it. Remember too, that this powder was not stable like that we use today."

    On September 1, 1774, just before dawn, Gage sent approximately 260 Redcoats up the Mystic River to seize several hundred barrels of powder from the Charlestown powder house and this became known as the “Powder Alarm.”

    Sounds very familiar doesn't it???
    The best way to survive a violent encounter is to be the one inflicting the most violence.

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