Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 16 to 29 of 29
  1. #16
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    In a warm, moist environment... Usually.
    Posts
    3,534
    Downloads
    6
    Uploads
    0
    Watch your round count. The guy that owns Battlefield Vegas posted his observations a couple years back on TOS, and lugs break off Toolcraft, and stock Colt bolts at around the 20k round count. Of course, for him, that could be two weeks, for others, it could be several lifetimes..
    There's no "Team" in F**K YOU!

  2. #17
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Location
    Mn.
    Posts
    1,525
    Downloads
    0
    Uploads
    0
    Yeah a heavy firing schedule makes a big difference. At every 3K rounds I swap all the springs, consumable ones that is. When you change an extractor spring its wise to do the ejector spring and ejector as well. They work together and the timing has to be spot on. At 6K rounds I do the springs again, a new bolt, firing pin and cam pin.
    The best way to survive a violent encounter is to be the one inflicting the most violence.

  3. #18
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Location
    SC
    Posts
    2,615
    Downloads
    0
    Uploads
    0
    For example when I go to a match, I take a spare rifle in case I have a catastrophic failure or one that would take a ton of time to fix.

    My parts kit includes the basics: spare bolt (not entire BCG), gas rings, firing pin and basically any other spring that can be accessed fairly easily (trigger, that type of thing).

    I got in a bad habit a few years ago building rifles around the spare bolt carrier groups and other parts that I had amassed that were simply supposed to be “in case of” items. Oops

  4. #19
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Posts
    116
    Downloads
    0
    Uploads
    0



    ...

  5. #20
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Location
    Mn.
    Posts
    1,525
    Downloads
    0
    Uploads
    0
    Molon, any idea what the round count was on those firing pins when they broke?
    The best way to survive a violent encounter is to be the one inflicting the most violence.

  6. #21
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Posts
    116
    Downloads
    0
    Uploads
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by Stone View Post
    Molon, any idea what the round count was on those firing pins when they broke?

    Unfortunately, I didn't keep track of the point at which they broke. A few things to note; the 2nd, 3rd and 4th firing pins in the above pic are titanium. Also, I do a lot of shooting and even more dry-firing. Those pins all broke while dry-firing.

  7. #22
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Location
    Mn.
    Posts
    1,525
    Downloads
    0
    Uploads
    0
    Thanks. Titanium is known for having "brittle" characteristics, I always wondered why they were making FP's out of it... Dry firing may be putting stress on the firing pin without having resistance such as a casing on the other end of it. Just a theory.
    The best way to survive a violent encounter is to be the one inflicting the most violence.

  8. #23
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    1,065
    Downloads
    0
    Uploads
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by Stone View Post
    Thanks. Titanium is known for having "brittle" characteristics, I always wondered why they were making FP's out of it... Dry firing may be putting stress on the firing pin without having resistance such as a casing on the other end of it. Just a theory.
    It's my understanding that Titanium firing pins have less mass than steel. The idea is the lower mass creates less chance of a slamfire, since an AR firing pin does not typically have a return spring. People also believe it lowers "lock time" as well, meaning the gun will go into battery more quickly. I personally would not use one on anything but a recreational .22lr.

  9. #24
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Location
    Mn.
    Posts
    1,525
    Downloads
    0
    Uploads
    0
    Interesting, thanks MD. Three out of four of the broken pins were titanium. Not a good average...
    The best way to survive a violent encounter is to be the one inflicting the most violence.

  10. #25
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    WA
    Posts
    1,909
    Downloads
    3
    Uploads
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by Molon View Post
    Unfortunately, I didn't keep track of the point at which they broke. A few things to note; the 2nd, 3rd and 4th firing pins in the above pic are titanium. Also, I do a lot of shooting and even more dry-firing. Those pins all broke while dry-firing.
    Titanium would be a poor choice for a duty type rifle and wouldn't likely provide an observable benefit. Far left FP looks like a 9mm.

  11. #26
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    5,349
    Downloads
    2
    Uploads
    0
    I'm obviously not an expert on the subject but I have seen several instances where titanium looks like it was the failure point, or at least was what was being blamed.

    From my reading titanium gets brittle at low temperature. One guy put his hunting rifle in his truck overnight with a titanium can on the end of it.

    The next morning it was super cold and on the first shot a seam open up length wise on the suppressor right where the engraving was at. It split it open.

    Given it rarely gets cold where I am at but if I lived in North Dakota it might be something to research.

  12. #27
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Posts
    116
    Downloads
    0
    Uploads
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by Eric View Post
    Titanium would be a poor choice for a duty type rifle and wouldn't likely provide an observable benefit. Far left FP looks like a 9mm.


    Did I say I used those titanium pins on my duty type rifles?

  13. #28
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Posts
    1,982
    Downloads
    0
    Uploads
    0
    I think where it comes from matters. A couple years ago I had a conversation with Joel of V Seven about titanium fire pins. My inquiry was about how much it would affect lock time, and about pin breakage. He recounted to me a conversation he had with Bill Geissele about lock time, and that titanium firing pins were close to worthless when it came to any advantages regarding lock time. Basically it boiled down to how much firing pin acceleration are you really going to gain in that 1/8 in. of travel, under hammer fall energy, by shaving a few grams? And that you’d be better served by a trigger with a faster hammer if lock time was your actual goal.

    As for breakage he told me most people were/are making titanium firing pins out of the hardest titanium available (I can’t remember which grade he specified, but he DID specify one) and that due to this they tended to be somewhat brittle. He also said his titanium pins were made of a slightly softer, much tougher grade and that out of all the ones he had sold, only one customer had reached out with a potential issue. It had chipped very slightly at the tip but was still running 100% and did not result in a sharp edge or the piercing of primers. V Seven eagerly sent him a replacement anyways.

    He also mentioned they also really only made them for the “hyper light” AR crowd, but still wanted to execute them as flawlessly as they could, which definitely stands by true V Seven form.
    -One Nation, Under God

    -"The bad news is time flies. The good news is you're the pilot." ~ Michael Althsuler

  14. #29
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    WA
    Posts
    1,909
    Downloads
    3
    Uploads
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by Molon View Post
    Did I say I used those titanium pins on my duty type rifles?
    Obviously not. That was just a general note for those folks who might think it's a good idea.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •