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  1. #61
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    Mega Pixels is one of the great marketing ploys perpetrated on an uninformed public. The quality of the sensor, regardless of MP count has a much bigger impact on image quality unless you are trying to blow up an image to a very large size. There are point and shoot cameras and even cell phone cameras that have large MP's. The problem is that they are just cramming more MP into a tiny sensor. the result is noisier images.

    If you have some manual control on your camera and can adjust aperture, shutter speed, ISO, etc that is a start but won't totally overcome a bad sensor (when comparing a similar image to one taken by an expensive camera.

    That being said, many times when you look at an image and say "wow!" it is often due to a few things: Composition (not camera dependent) Light (not camera dependent) Depth of Focus (can be camera or lens dependent) and finally a crisp, detailed final output (a lot of camera and some post processing)

    Knowing that many of the above are not camera dependent, it tells you that with some work, your images can improve dramatically with whatever you are shooting with.

    All of that goes out the window if you are a sports shooter, or a wildlife shooter since they are very gear intensive and it is nearly impossible to mimic the good shots you see without an expensive camera and even more expensive lenses.

    Hope that helps.

    Peter

    so I replied after reading the first page and not noticing that there were already five pages

    another thing to consider when working with light. side lighting that rakes across the subject is a great way to highlight texture whereas direct lighting tends to minimize it. A great book to pick up that will give you a wealth of info in terms of shooting different products is "Light, Science and Magic"
    http://www.amazon.com/Light-Science-.../dp/0240808193

    Cheers and good luck to all.
    Last edited by lingeringlight; 11 April 2011 at 17:19.
    Everything rising up collapses
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  2. #62
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    I just use a 40" soft box and 4 slaved flashes. I shoot RAW so I can tweak the exposure curve. Poster board in various colors works better for me than cloth backdrops because of the shadows from wrinkles.

  3. #63
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    Quote Originally Posted by lingeringlight View Post

    That being said, many times when you look at an image and say "wow!" it is often due to a few things: Composition (not camera dependent) Light (not camera dependent) Depth of Focus (can be camera or lens dependent) and finally a crisp, detailed final output (a lot of camera and some post processing)

    Knowing that many of the above are not camera dependent, it tells you that with some work, your images can improve dramatically with whatever you are shooting with.


    Hope that helps.

    Peter

    Very very very true. People want to buy into things when they could be using natural light and a point & shoot camera and shooting posters and covers.

  4. #64
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    I like some of the things this gentleman has to say:

    But I will be the first to admit that there are many semi-pro and amateur photographers out there whose work easily rivals and even surpasses that of established professional photographers, so in my eyes there is no need to have any inferiority feelings by not being a full time pro. I have seen many images by amateur photographers that I would have been proud to have in my body of work.
    Photography is about composition, subject, lighting, technical competence, etc. It is not about equipment. Yes equipment helps, but a creative and imaginative person with a cheap camera will always outclass an uninspired photographer with the very best equipment.
    http://dannysteyn.us/how-to-become-a...otographer.htm

  5. #65
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stickman View Post
    I tend to over or underexpose for my shots as needed. The easiest way to shoot a white background is to put down something white (paper, tablecloth, your wifes discount wedding dresses etc.). Put it in shade, then take your picture. You will have to play around with the exposure, but raise it a bit, and see how you like it. If you need more white, and less gray, overexpose by a little more. The shade will provide a softer, more even light, and its a very easy way to shoot your pictures.

    By doing this, you won't need to do much work in post processing, if anything at all. I know there are guys who cut out backgrounds and do lots of other work in photoshop, but since I am horrible at photoshop, I need to get the results I want in the camera.


    There are lots of other ways to shoot on a white background, but the above is what I've found to be the easiest, and quickest.



    Note that I didn't say exactly how much to alter the exposure, that because it is going to depend on a few different variables. Play around, and see what you like. Its digital, so shoot a bunch and see what you like best.
    I really liked your idea of white background with some white paper. I am new in photography so its lots to learn. Sorry for old thread reply and thanks for nice thought:)
    Last edited by WallaceLambert; 12 June 2013 at 03:43.

  6. #66
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    what is a good lighting setup to start with. I don't want to do this professionally but I want it to look nice. I need budget lighting that will just work

  7. #67
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    Quote Originally Posted by Computalotapus View Post
    what is a good lighting setup to start with. I don't want to do this professionally but I want it to look nice. I need budget lighting that will just work
    Post #11 in this thread has a photo of my lighting setup with some details on it. Inexpensive and easy to assemble when needed.
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  8. #68
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jerry R View Post
    Post #11 in this thread has a photo of my lighting setup with some details on it. Inexpensive and easy to assemble when needed.
    Jerry that is perfect. Did you follow a guide on building the light box or just wing it and build to fit your needs.

    I have a dedicated "shop" room in the basement that will serve as my reload/kydex/photo room. I like the idea of the expandable light box. I think I can hang the fabric from the wall and make it so I can just pull down the backdrop color I want then roll it back up when I'm done. The light box being portable is key as I have only the one giant table to work with for everything I am doing in that room.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  9. #69
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    I drew out what I wanted, and just cut the pieces. Once I had the drawing, I contacted the greenhouse supply company for the connectors - corner pieces are the really hard ones to find locally - a three pipe connector - 90 degree with a vertical for the third pipe. When I expand it to six feet, the back has a couple of extra verticals to help support it without sagging. I bought the pipe clamps to secure a diffuser (white cloth) to the box and I put the colored backdrops inside that. You can see in the photo how the diffuser is pulled back for clarity on the frame. The small box is basically a two foot cube, to enlarge it I can add a two foot "wing" to either side, or both for a six foot box. When enlarged, the two front legs of the two foot box are removed - different connectors required. Hope that helped.

    Edit: Nothing is glued, all pieces are press-fit when needed.
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  10. #70
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jerry R View Post
    I drew out what I wanted, and just cut the pieces. Once I had the drawing, I contacted the greenhouse supply company for the connectors - corner pieces are the really hard ones to find locally - a three pipe connector - 90 degree with a vertical for the third pipe. When I expand it to six feet, the back has a couple of extra verticals to help support it without sagging. I bought the pipe clamps to secure a diffuser (white cloth) to the box and I put the colored backdrops inside that. You can see in the photo how the diffuser is pulled back for clarity on the frame. The small box is basically a two foot cube, to enlarge it I can add a two foot "wing" to either side, or both for a six foot box. When enlarged, the two front legs of the two foot box are removed - different connectors required. Hope that helped.

    Edit: Nothing is glued, all pieces are press-fit when needed.
    I spent about an hour looking at your photo. I think I have an idea on how it all needs to be put together. I gotta find a way to flatten the surface of my table first..maybe screw down a sheet of plexiglass or lexan

  11. #71
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    Skimmed through the thread, good info.

    Once piece I'd like some people who do this to comment on is watermarking an image. I do not seem to bother with it (usually) and even though Stick's watermark is awesome, I do not want to copy his sweet idea, any suggestions?

  12. #72
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    I have started watermarking some of my photos. Not that they are worth stealing, but just to identify the "author". If done subtly, it does not distract from the image. Stick, and some of the other admins and staff are professionals. They need to protect their work. As to suggestions, pick a symbol/name/something that is not only unique, but meaningful in that it reflects on you - recognizable as being yours alone, something from your personal history.
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  13. #73
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    Hey guys, I've been using this setup for a while now. I get decent images, but my camera is old & busted and I could use more light. It's a Canon Digital Rebel that my friend saved - it was waterlogged and he got it working but several features don't work, such as the flash and Live View. I've used it a lot and I think I'm finally to the point where I believe I've exceeded the capabilities of the camera and setup.

    I want to create a bigger, better setup to accommodate large items such as a full-length AR15. This will be necessary to post photos for my upcoming Stickman 50K giveaway rifle build.

    I also want to do some video work with a green screen, so I need continuous lighting and lots of it.

    I have about 150 square feet of space that I can dedicate to a studio. It will be multi-purpose, so it would be nice if everything were easily moveable & stowable so that I could rearrange for various work. I have to do a lot with this limited space, and I only have a couple 15 Amp outlets nearby so power efficiency is also a huge concern.

    Should I try to find another, larger self-contained lightbox? Or build a setup myself? What lights would you recommend? Do you use a lighted table? Are specific fabrics important or will bed sheets work?

    I'm more interested in feedback about the lightbox and the lighting. I'll upgrade the camera too, but that is a much more personal-preference kind of decision.

    Any input would be greatly appreciated!


  14. #74
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    Are you sure those are the only issues with the waterlogged camera? I'm curious to see some of your pictures from that setup. Maybe you've already posted some and I just missed it?

  15. #75
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    Yeah it's kind of surprising he was able to recover it, but it seems to work ok for basic shots.

    IIRC, most of these were taken with a Canon 35-80 lens.

    Here are some examples, both in the lightbox and out:







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