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  1. #1
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    Hudson Manufacturing Bankruptcy

    Not being a Hudson owner myself, watching their problems, issues, and ultimately folding was interesting to watch from the sidelines. Now this from K&E Arms:

    In the past week Hudson Manufacturing’s bankruptcy filings became public. KE Arms LLC is listed as a creditor in these documents. As this is now in the public sphere, we feel it is now appropriate to discuss this publicly.

    KE Arms manufactured the bulk of the slides for Hudson H9s. We were selected to produce these parts by Hudson because of our experience manufacturing pistol slides for a variety of OEM clients, and our ability to ramp up production. At one point we were delivering 400 H9 slides per week to Hudson Manufacturing. We also developed and prototyped the H9A frame.

    The last payment we received from Hudson was in July of 2018. Between delivered product, inventory on hand, and development fees we are owed in the upwards of seven figure range.

    We are currently exploring market demand for the slides and alloy frames (made from 7075 billet) we have on hand, and manufacturing new small parts. We want to recover our costs, and help existing owners of H9s that currently have nowhere to turn for service and support. Like those who have sent in guns months ago to Hudson for service and heard nothing back, we also have not had communication with Hudson in months.

    If you’re interested in slides, frames, and parts for the H9 Pistol. Please comment here or e-mail sales@kearms.com

  2. #2
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    I wonder if this is common practice in the gun industry to work on credit? That's not a smart aleck comment, but rather a genuine question.

  3. #3
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    It is common for most companies to work on credit. Gun companies are no different.

    I was under the impression that some website like grabagun or buds was selling remaining hudson inventory at deep discounts.

    I was excited for this gun since it seemed like an interesting idea that was well executed. Unfortunately I've been out of the county since they were released so I never had the opportunity to buy or even shoot one. Kind of hope a competent manufacturer buys the patients and makes a v2 to work out some of the kinks.

  4. #4
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    Interesting dialog here from Ian of Forgotten Weapons about the Hudson bankruptcy:


  5. #5
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    http://www.recoilweb.com/hudson-manu...LtbBWCr0f5Kxjc

    Looks like during the bankruptcy proceedings, Cy Hudson basically admits all of the warranty claims they had are just a pile of parts. Those owners will likely never see them in one piece again.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by schambers View Post
    It is common for most companies to work on credit. Gun companies are no different.

    I was under the impression that some website like grabagun or buds was selling remaining hudson inventory at deep discounts.

    I was excited for this gun since it seemed like an interesting idea that was well executed. Unfortunately I've been out of the county since they were released so I never had the opportunity to buy or even shoot one. Kind of hope a competent manufacturer buys the patients and makes a v2 to work out some of the kinks.
    In my "after military" life, you are 100% correct, however you need to be pretty solid to get that credit. I worked for a company that dealt almost 100% with very difficult to work (ex. Inconel) materials. However, the owner would get contracts in the millions, and borrow against the government contract. Scary part is, the MIL can cancel a contract at anytime, and civilian contractors can file bankruptcy at anytime, so It's walking a tight rope all of the time. Now days , if a company is borrowing from job to job, they might be flying on borrowed wings anyway.

    FT
    NRA Life Member
    Deplorables Life Member



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