Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 16 to 29 of 29

Thread: Concealed Carry

  1. #16
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Posts
    64
    Downloads
    0
    Uploads
    0
    For appendix what type of cut should I be looking for, or is this body type specific? Not entirely sure what you mean by cut. Thank you.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  2. #17
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    SE Florida
    Posts
    1,113
    Downloads
    0
    Uploads
    0
    Carry preferences are SO personal as to be almost useless in terms of what other people do. Holsters, guns, positions, etc. are all subject to too many variable to think that what works for any one person would work for you. However, we can look at trends and commonalities and start to get an idea.

    Position
    By far, the 3-4 o'clock position for right-handed shooters is the most common.

    Inside/outside
    For newer shooters just getting started, and who are often more conscious of being spotted, IWB is far more common. That said, you have to figure out if your current clothing will acoomodate that. If not, you may want to try a single pair of pants with a slightly larger, or adjustable, waist before changing your entire wardrobe.

    Firearm
    As mentioned above, there is a lot of love for the single-stack 9mm. Especially true given the two criteria above. Problem is, there aren't a lot of single-stack 9s that are worth a damn. Some will point to Kahrs, but for every guy that loves his, there's another one that hates them. a 50/50 split isn't too encouraging, IMO. The Glock 26, while not being single stack, is probably the most common CWP gun I see anywhere. The S&W M&P sheild is about 1/4" thinner than the G26 but I'm not up on whether they are considered good to go or not.

    Holster Mounting
    Havving two clips/loops, one on either side of the gun, is pretty widely accepted as the easiest to conceal because the attachments are building bulk on top of the gun. Examples would be the Versa Max II in leather and the Raven Concealment holsters in Kydex. Kydex is definitely the order of the day in 2014.

    Belt
    Opinions vary on relative stiffness (there is a trend of late to go really nutso with belt stiffness) but chances are none of the belts in your closet are sufficient, even the ones you think are. The baseline for most folks is the Wilderness Istructor belt 5-stitch. Not a lot of people look for a belt that is less stiff than that, but some people wind up wanting MOAR.

    Based on all of the above, my personal suggestion to anyone looking to start carrying is to buy a Glock 26, a Raven Concealment holster with IWB soft loops, and a belt from The Wilderness. The problem is, the G26 just isn't that much fun to shoot. The solution is to buy a Glock 19, and a holster cut for the Glock 19, to start out with and the holster and mag pouches will work for the G26 later on if you find the G19 to be too large. Plus, using the G19 mag(s) as a spare for the G26 means you get 11 in the gun and 15 on the hip. Beyond what comes with the gun(s), buy Glock 17 magazines from there on out as they'll work in all of the 9mm Glocks.
    WWW.TACTICALYELLOWVISOR.NET

  3. #18
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Posts
    702
    Downloads
    0
    Uploads
    0

    Concealed Carry

    Quote Originally Posted by BM2 View Post
    For appendix what type of cut should I be looking for, or is this body type specific? Not entirely sure what you mean by cut. Thank you.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Sorry....I'll try to explain myself better. I am not aware of a specific cut per se, but more of how the manufacturers cuts or leaves the material surrounding the form of the pistol. Some hybrids (kydex plus leather) are a bit more comfortable than just all kydex. I had to get rid of the leather since I work in a hot climate and it absorbed all of my sweat which started to have adverse effects on my pistol and ammo. In reference to body type I was just referring to slimmer people over those with a keg belly.

    If the AIWB carry works out for you I think you'll find it has many benefits over any other position.

  4. #19
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Location
    MD, USA
    Posts
    173
    Downloads
    0
    Uploads
    0
    I carry (when I'm not in MD) just forward of 3 o'clock. About 2:45 or so. IWB. Even my G20 is sufficiently concealed under just a T. Quality holsters and belts play a bigger part in concealment than the size of the gun.

    Also, too many people sacrifice shootability for a gun that truly disappears. It really only needs to be invisible to a casual inspection as 99.9% of the population is oblivious. The other .1% tends to be fellow carriers, not cops or criminals.

  5. #20
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Location
    SE MI
    Posts
    4,510
    Downloads
    2
    Uploads
    0
    I use a Raven Concealment VG2 for appendix. Sitting is fine for me.
    Ground Defense 1, Blade Defense 1, Defensive Pistol 1 & 2, WTGB, Alliance Shoothouse, YSINTG, Carbine 1, DART Medical, NRA Range Safety Officer
    Save 10% "JOINORDIE" http://cmttac.com/
    david@damagephotos.com
    Damage Photos on Facebook
    @damage_photos on Instagram

  6. #21
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    SE Florida
    Posts
    1,113
    Downloads
    0
    Uploads
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by JoshAston View Post
    Also, too many people sacrifice shootability for a gun that truly disappears.
    Disagree strongly.

    What's the first rule of a gunfight? Have a gun! not to mention that, statistically, simply having the gun is what makes the difference. Despite what pockets of the internet might say, making headshots at 25 yards and carrying 35 rounds of ammo in spare mags isn't really a deciding factor often enough to even be considered as relevant.
    WWW.TACTICALYELLOWVISOR.NET

  7. #22
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    PNW
    Posts
    13,714
    Downloads
    0
    Uploads
    0
    My philosophy on concealed carry is like rob says, to have a gun in case of a gun fight.

    I carry a Kahr CW9, because for me it's not practical to carry a Glock 17 like I do on duty. My job is also different on my off-duty time. My first plan in an escalating situation is verbal deescalation or fleeing the scene.

    If I have no other choice, and I have to draw and shoot, I'm not looking for a sustained gunfight, It's shoot, then retreat if/when possible, call 911.

    Sure, having a larger gun that's easier to shoot with more rounds is ideally better, but realistically, I have to make choices based on practicality. For me that's a smaller gun, with fewer rounds. I believe my skills and gun choice will be able to handle most encounters, because reality tells me there is no way I can plan for everything.

  8. #23
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Location
    MD, USA
    Posts
    173
    Downloads
    0
    Uploads
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by rob_s View Post
    Disagree strongly.

    What's the first rule of a gunfight? Have a gun! not to mention that, statistically, simply having the gun is what makes the difference. Despite what pockets of the internet might say, making headshots at 25 yards and carrying 35 rounds of ammo in spare mags isn't really a deciding factor often enough to even be considered as relevant.
    Kahr K9, S&W 3913, Glock 19, Colt Officers ACP, are all plenty concealable while still being very shootable. Micro 9s, even most of the pocket .380s aren't all that easy to shoot well. Statistically I'll never even need to draw my gun. Obviously I can't always be prepared for the worst case scenario by rolling in an MRAP with dual mounted M2 and Mk19, so I'll compromise by carrying a compact, or even sometimes full size, pistol rather than a micro.

    I do own a few of the tiny pistols for those times when I feel like carrying a backup or I'm in a situation where I can't carry a gun.

  9. #24
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    SE Florida
    Posts
    1,113
    Downloads
    0
    Uploads
    0
    Within the context of this thread, we're talking about someone that's new to carrying, and may be new(ish) to shooting, or at least shooting with a higher purpose.

    Telling someone like that "you're doing it wrong" if they're not carrying a 5" 1911 or a Glock 17 is counter-productive. I encourage people to start with the largest gun they feel comfortable concealing. Why? Because a guy that leaves the house with a gun he's comfortable with is better than the guy who leaves the house with the gun that makes him self-conscious and drags his pants down. My first "real" handgun (after a cheap .45 and a 686) was a Glock 26, followed a couple of months later by a Glock 19. I actually shot the 26 better than I did the 19 for a long time. I've carried, since then, a 5" all-steel 1911, an aluminum 4.25" 1911, a Glock 19, a Glock 26, an NAA mini-mag, a Kel Tec P32, and a S&W VTAC M&P. For many years if I was outside the house and not in a prohibited area, I was carrying a gun.

    But then, these days I rarely carry at all, and when I do it's a j-frame, a small fixed blade, and 40 years of hate. Most days I just roll out with the hate and a sharp pen.
    WWW.TACTICALYELLOWVISOR.NET

  10. #25
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    N. KY
    Posts
    2,676
    Downloads
    1
    Uploads
    0
    One thing I haven't seen mentioned which can make a big difference in your choice of carry, method and concealment types. Your state laws. In KY we have open carry. So, if you get a CCW here, you won't have to worry about "printing". If you have to carry a firearm so deeply concealed that any possibility of the most slightest bit of printing, in my opinion takes away a lot of advantage of any training you may have. Gang bangers, and Meth heads normally just have theirs handy under their shirts, or in their pockets where they can access very quickly. You'll have to make all of those decisions as to the best way to comfortably carry.

    Me, I don't worry. Since it's "open carry" here,, if you have a weapon under your shirt, and you bend over to grab something off the shelf at the grocery store and your pistol/holster shows briefly then you're good to go, either way, because you still have a CCW, so there's no grey area there. I can carry what I want, usually a M&P or a G23 in a BladeTech eclipse holster at approx. 3:30 with a slight forward (FBI "type") cant, and I'm cool. Our build sizes are similar, per your description. So I have no need for an extra wardrobe of oversized pants and shirts to "hide" my weapon. When wearing an old pair of BDU's fishing along some creeks and rivers, where I may face rabid coyotes, fox, dogs and drug manufacturers and growers, I sometimes use an IWB because I can adjust the waist size, and it keeps everything from getting muddy when I inevitably slip in some mud.

    Most sates aren't as lenient as KY so you need to be very well versed in your states laws before picking any style of concealment, and what may or may not occur while just simply carrying concealed.

    One last thing, you may end up trying several carry methods, before you find out what is best for you. What feels comfortable and compliant with the law today, may after many hours of wear, you may find it not quite so comfortable as you thought.

    Good Luck,

    FT
    NRA Life Member
    Deplorables Life Member



  11. #26
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Posts
    2,773
    Downloads
    0
    Uploads
    0
    For those new to carrying I would HIGHLY suggest carrying strong side (if right handed) 3 o'clock. Get used to doing that, practice with it and then move on to appendix if you can/feel comfortable doing so.

    There are dozens of places to get good holsters made up and some will even work for AIWB as well as standard IWB carry.

  12. #27
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Posts
    64
    Downloads
    0
    Uploads
    0
    Vermont doesn't have carry laws. Can be concealed or open it doesn't matter. I just think concealed gives more options than if someone knows you are carrying. Based off what some of you have said I think I may try to carry my current HK strong side even if there is printing or slightly uncomfortable for a bit. I can then better understand what my body type can handle and what I find comfortable. Thanks for all the input. I really appreciate the help.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  13. #28
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Posts
    198
    Downloads
    0
    Uploads
    0
    I can confidently say hardly anyone notices when I open carry so I no longer worry about printing when I conceal. Wearing a shirt with any kind of pattern helps break up the print of the firearm.


    Although I am definitely an open carry fan for many reasons, there are times when i choose to CC. Drawing from CC especially in winter needs to be practiced a lot. It's not like OC where you can use the correct 5 point draw, you have to use your spare hand to move your shirt/jacket up and make sure the firearm doesnt hang on it.

    I encourage everyone to get a friend and try the Tueller drill and draw from your standard holster whatever that may be. You can either build a simple H stand on a base with four wheels and have your partner pull it towards you from 21' or have two targets 42' apart with both people in the middle. the firearm holder draws and shoots the opposite direction as the person running toward the other target with a faux knife or baton. It's pretty surprising and fun. It really demonstrates how important situation awareness is. I can assure you whether you shoot someone with a ruger LCP or 1911, they're not going to be happy. The most important thing is to be able to draw, aim, ready weapon from muscle memory.

  14. #29
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Posts
    2,773
    Downloads
    0
    Uploads
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by Kopis View Post
    I encourage everyone to get a friend and try the Tueller drill and draw from your standard holster whatever that may be. You can either build a simple H stand on a base with four wheels and have your partner pull it towards you from 21' or have two targets 42' apart with both people in the middle. the firearm holder draws and shoots the opposite direction as the person running toward the other target with a faux knife or baton. It's pretty surprising and fun. It really demonstrates how important situation awareness is. I can assure you whether you shoot someone with a ruger LCP or 1911, they're not going to be happy. The most important thing is to be able to draw, aim, MOVE, ready weapon from muscle memory.
    added something for you.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •