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  1. #76
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    [QUOTE=Aberration79;150461]If anyone knows people to pass this on to where it would reach a much larger audience I would appreciate it. I honestly don't want anyone to have a true AD and wind up damaging property or hurting themseI

    If your ejector housing has any sort of "adjustment screw" then you are running a mix of aftermarket, well... garbage.

    All Glocks contact the plastic portion of the rear rail at the bend in the trigger bar arm when no slide is present, this is a non issue. You don't need to spread your message to a wider audience, but instead take all the aftermarket / possibly wrong parts out of your gun, make sure your frame is milled 100% correctly, gain a greater understanding of how the parts interact, and test again.

  2. #77
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    Quote Originally Posted by Axlnut View Post
    If your ejector housing has any sort of "adjustment screw" then you are running a mix of aftermarket, well... garbage.

    All Glocks contact the plastic portion of the rear rail at the bend in the trigger bar arm when no slide is present, this is a non issue. You don't need to spread your message to a wider audience, but instead take all the aftermarket / possibly wrong parts out of your gun, make sure your frame is milled 100% correctly, gain a greater understanding of how the parts interact, and test again.
    The ejector housing is a Glock housing that is tapped for a setscrew to reduce over travel. The cruciform was not even contacting the adjustment screw and so it can not be a problem. When I first discovered the problem my first thought was the connector as that seems to be a common problem. Its not that complicated. There is bulge in the slide that moves the connector aside and allows the spring to pull the cruciform up. When I engaged the connector before the cruciform did not spring up. It was sluggish. If its sluggish moving up, its not going to engage the striker reliably. I then filed some off the rail, and now it springs up and engages the striker. I can replicate this by adjusting the overtravel screw in so it stops before the rail, as if before I filed the rail.

    If there is something I missed, fill me in. Don't just dismiss it because aftermarket parts and tell me to learn more. Actually tell me what is wrong with the part or what I don't know.

    P.S. New rear rail is getting installed now. My only regret here is not taking pictures and documenting the failure. Since I got 2 other out of spec rails, where the pin didn't line up between the frame and the rail, I might try them both to see if they have the same problem. Unless the pin doesn't line up, then its moot.
    Last edited by Aberration79; 22 May 2017 at 19:51.

  3. #78
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    Quote Originally Posted by Aberration79 View Post
    The ejector housing is a Glock housing that is tapped for a setscrew to reduce over travel. The cruciform was not even contacting the adjustment screw and so it can not be a problem. When I first discovered the problem my first thought was the connector as that seems to be a common problem. Its not that complicated. There is bulge in the slide that moves the connector aside and allows the spring to pull the cruciform up. When I engaged the connector before the cruciform did not spring up. It was sluggish. If its sluggish moving up, its not going to engage the striker reliably. I then filed some off the rail, and now it springs up and engages the striker. I can replicate this by adjusting the overtravel screw in so it stops before the rail, as if before I filed the rail.

    If there is something I missed, fill me in. Don't just dismiss it because aftermarket parts and tell me to learn more. Actually tell me what is wrong with the part or what I don't know.

    P.S. New rear rail is getting installed now. My only regret here is not taking pictures and documenting the failure. Since I got 2 other out of spec rails, where the pin didn't line up between the frame and the rail, I might try them both to see if they have the same problem. Unless the pin doesn't line up, then its moot.
    Ok, lets start with this:

    I just measured P80 940C and a G19. The area of the frame (it's not really a frame rail) that the trigger bar contacts are the exact same length. They are the same distance from every verifiable data point on the frame.

    The issue you describe with the cruciform not cleanly releasing from the connector is common on new pistols, and pistols assembled from various parts. It can be the factory "lube", a mis-adjusted connector, an aftermarket slide not fitting will, connector not seated fully, etc etc.

    I have personally witnessed it dozens of times and it is usually fixed by taking everything apart, cleaning it, applying the proper single drop of lube, and making sure it is re-assembled right.

    I suspect your fix was the same, you just added a bunch of un-needed filing.

    I don't mean to be dismissive, I just want to stop your goal of shouting from a rooftop downing a product you have had (multiple) issues with, that can all be easily and commonly attributed to an error in final "machining" or assembling.

  4. #79
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    Thanks for being constructive. The new rail is in. Its not lubed at all, I wiped it down when I took it apart. It has a problem resetting. IMO any problem with a trigger resetting, especially if the striker is being released without pulling the trigger is an issue that should be shouted from the roof top. What issues in final machining or assembly would cause this. I will look at it.

    When I did the filing it was a simple process. Pull the slide off, punch the pin, lift the extractor housing, file the side of the rail. Put it together, check the reset. I did this until the trigger reset. Criticizing a product is not downing it.

    I tried installing the other 2 rails in this frame. This issue is the same, the hole through the rail does not line up to the frame. Yet I have 2 rails in which the holes in the rail do line up to the frame.
    Last edited by Aberration79; 22 May 2017 at 22:53.

  5. #80
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    Glock projects have taken a big part of what used to be the AR market. And like the AR market the 80% frames cost more than their finished counterparts. Also with these 80% projects determining the error will probably take more effort, another reason I would prefer an OEM frame to start a project. But take my opinion with a grain of salt, cause I'm also one who does not like to shoot another's reloads due to safety.
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  6. #81
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    Quote Originally Posted by GOST View Post
    Glock projects have taken a big part of what used to be the AR market. And like the AR market the 80% frames cost more than their finished counterparts. Also with these 80% projects determining the error will probably take more effort, another reason I would prefer an OEM frame to start a project. But take my opinion with a grain of salt, cause I'm also one who does not like to shoot another's reloads due to safety.
    GOST, I see these same arguments pop up every time someone mentions building an 80% project. "frames cost more..da..da..da..etc.

    By your logic most folks on this forum wouldn't be here. Most here, it seems, tend to build their own AR's, starting with a clean sheet of paper, and ending up with a finished rifle. Most people could probably buy an off-the-shelf AR for far less than it would cost to build a decent rifle, using non-OEM parts. Then there's the cost of tools, etc..etc...

    The off-the-shelf AR should probably work just fine out of the box...The home built AR may require trouble shooting to various degrees. The off-the-shelf rifle should have a warranty, the home built will require your own trouble shooting.

    Anyone who thinks it's a "budget" solution to having a nice "glock-like" pistol is sadly mistaken. But I'm sure the vast majority of folks who do this kind of thing are pretty much aware of the costs and perils of building their own, and are up to the challenge and "heartache" if all does not go exactly as planned.

    The same applies to a "home built" AR. They are rarely a good alternative proposition, if costs are the major factor in deciding to buy vs. build. You can almost always buy a quality factory weapon for less $$ than building your own.

    Chances are, a poorly built AR, albeit low, can result in your rifle turning into shrapnel in your face, is as real as having a poorly built Glock kit take your hand off.

    So if you apply your logic to the AR builds, from a non-OEM box of parts, I'm afraid not many folks would be building them either. The "ease" of buying over doing an 80% project, or the costs vs. just going out and buying one, should not even be a consideration for folks taking these projects on. I think, like myself, most are experimenter's and tinkerers and know this going in.

    ...(three grains of salt) for you, buddy!

    FT
    Last edited by FortTom; 23 May 2017 at 12:58.
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  7. #82
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    My previous post FT is referring to both 80% Glock frames and 80% AR lowers, as I described in the post. I might be wrong FT but I doubt that the majority here are assembling AR's using 80% lowers. I have assembled several AR's with finished lowers, but have never used an 80% for the reasons I noted. You may have several more using 80% Glock frames, but again I would guess that the majority here assembling Glocks are using OEM frames. If 80% is your thing then go for, but I personally rather not.
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  8. #83
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    Quote Originally Posted by GOST View Post
    My previous post FT is referring to both 80% Glock frames and 80% AR lowers, as I described in the post. I might be wrong FT but I doubt that the majority here are assembling AR's using 80% lowers. I have assembled several AR's with finished lowers, but have never used an 80% for the reasons I noted. You may have several more using 80% Glock frames, but again I would guess that the majority here assembling Glocks are using OEM frames. If 80% is your thing then go for, but I personally rather not.
    Actually, I never mentioned 80% AR Lowers, especially the polymer type, don't know where you got the idea that I was referring to most folks here using 80% AR lowers. I would guess that that number would be closer to 0%. I was speaking of people making the argument that it's cheaper to buy a Glock OEM receiver. Yeah, we get it. Now, what if you like the P80 frame better than the Glock frame, as far as the shape and ergonomics.

    I was speaking to the point that folks who build AR's out of aftermarket AR parts, usually know going in, that it's more expensive to build than to buy. That's all. The usual warning that it's cheaper to buy a Glock frame..etc..etc., is pretty moot, and really doesn't apply unless somebody is under the false impression that it's a money saving tactic to just drill a couple of holes and mill a little plastic. Match grade barrels, premium triggers, the frame, stippling, a slide, and all of the bits and pieces add up to probably twice what a stock Glock would cost. If a person doesn't know that going in, they probably need to study the proposition a little more before proceeding with an 80% frame proposition.

    Also, 80% is not my "thing". It's a one time deal for me, because as I've stated it's an experiment. And if the majority of folks here are building custom Glocks on OEM frames, well that's cool too, I wasn't speaking to that crowd.

    ..... (have some more salt)

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  9. #84
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    The post I made that you quoted was comparing 80% Glock frames to 80% AR lowers. My opinion on the 80% Glock frames is the same on 80% AR lowers. I also would have preferred metal slide rails on the rear of the frame. Others in this thread have also discussed preference for OEM frames for similar reasons as mine, just my opinion it's fine that we disagree.
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  10. #85
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    The PF940C has metal rails on the rear.

    Just an FYI on my build. I was on North Dakota and got back last night. Got the stock Glock trigger, connector and spring in. Same problem. If hold the trigger to the rear, with a half backplate, you can see the cruciform part that interacts with the connecter flex in, and doesn't repeatably get clear of the connector. Since I know the problem and solved it before, I am just going to file and round off the part of the rear rail that the trigger bar/cruciform contacts and flexes at.

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