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  1. #1
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    Cleaning cans...

    Bored and was curious about this, and I know quite a few guys use cans on here. So I know rimfire is able to be pulled apart to easily clean.

    Is ultrasonic the best way to clean stainless rimfire baffles?
    Other good options?

    What about sealed rifle cans..I hear they need to be cleaned somewhat. But not being able to dis assemble , how is it done?

    Iíve heard about throwing them in ultrasonic cleaners also.

    My Question, what chemical can be used that works but wonít F up the cerakote

  2. #2
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    On Sniper's Hide there is a LONG thread on cleaning sealed cans. I followed the instructions myself and it works. More than one method.

    I got some play dough type stuff and plugged the muzzle end of the can and filled it up with C4 Carbon Remover (a Boretech product) and let it soak. It will take a few days but it is 100% safe for the metal and finish. The caked on carbon will just melt away. You might have to repeat a couple of times for optimal results.

    I got my can within less than .25 oz of factory spec and called it good.

    Simple Green works too. Keep in mind this is something you only do once every year or two before it gets really bad, mainly as a preventative measure.

    Here is the thread. Some of the before and after pics are very impressive. Some people use many different methods and reported their results.

    https://www.snipershide.com/shooting...9#post-9187233

  3. #3
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    Here is an example. Before and after. Pic stolen from the thread above.

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    Name:  5905C2A5-B2DD-4FDD-A577-1981CB384EA0.jpg
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  4. #4
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    Name:  D8A01188-EFDE-4186-8266-14D128A4E444.jpg
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Size:  349.7 KB

  5. #5
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    That is impressive. For pistol baffles I just scrub with a stiff brush (not steel) and solvent until they feel smooth. Looking pretty is not a priority for me.
    ďWhat in the world is a moderate interpretation of a constitutional text? Halfway between what it says and what we'd like it to say?" -Antonin Scalia

  6. #6
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    Iíve only ever manually removed deposits from blast chambers on my centerfire cans when they start growing kind of large

    Iíve read you can plug the exit aperature, fill the can with whatever solvent of choice and then let it soak for a couple days. Empty, rinse, make sure nothing is loose and rattling around in the can (like chunks of debris) and proceed. Iíd weigh it before and after to see if much of anything came out

  7. #7
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    Thanks for the info Alamo

    So what’s the preferred method for rimfire- stainless baffles

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by mustangfreek View Post
    So whatís the preferred method for rimfire- stainless baffles
    Search for a post here on WEVO I made several years back on "The Dip". Vinegar + Hydrogen Peroxide, IIRC. You put your stainless parts in the solution and it quickly eats the lead, creating a Lead Acetate solution. Lead Acetate will easily pass through the skin however, so it is dangerous. No more dangerous than battery acid though, and if you use proper precautions it's not going to hurt you. Afterwards you can add salt and turn it into Lead Nitrate, which is much less dangerous as it won't pass through the skin. Dispose of it as "Battery Acid" at your local hazmat facility. I've been doing this with my 22Sparrow silencers for years and they always come out looking brand new.

    For the larger calibers, I never bother. Especially on 5.56/.223 the blast will vaporize any deposits when you shoot it. They really don't have any appreciable buildup over time.

    PS Jesus Christ the search on this forum sucks ass. I can't find my old post ... just search the web you'll find it "The Dip Lead Acetate"
    Last edited by MoxyDave; 12 January 2021 at 18:03.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by mustangfreek View Post
    Thanks for the info Alamo

    So what’s the preferred method for rimfire- stainless baffles
    I'm actually growing fond of C4 carbon remover. It's great stuff. Soak your baffles in that for a little bit (maybe over night or just a few hours)...then tumble with stainless steel media like you would brass.

    I say that with one caveat... I go sometimes too long between cleanings for my rimfire cans and the longer you let that carbon sit caked on there the harder it will be to remove. If you just tumble with stainless steel media it might take 2 or 3 cycles to get them clean. But if you pre soak with some C4 you only need to tumble like half an hour or so.

    It just depends on how often you clean and how bad the carbon is built up.

    Any kind of carbon remover will work for the pre-soak. I've just taken a liking to C4.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by MoxyDave View Post
    For the larger calibers, I never bother. Especially on 5.56/.223 the blast will vaporize any deposits when you shoot it. They really don't have any appreciable buildup over time.
    Based on my experience I would personally change the phrasing of that a little bit. True 5.56 cans don't get a lot of build up. The pressure and velocities of the gasses don't build up nearly as much.

    I cleaned a 5.56 can that has a lot more rounds on it simply because I've had it longer. I weighed it before the clean and after and I did get quite a bit out of the can but it wasn't nearly as bad as I thought it would be.

    Then I cleaned my Recce 7 and it was SUBSTANTIALLY heavier than factory spec. I put at least several thousand rounds of 300BLK through it and it was really dirty. I have to go back and look exactly how much carbon fouling came out of it but it wasn't just a little bit.

    In other words it depends on what you are shooting and how much of it you shoot. Pretty much for me about once every year or two I will perform a cleaning job on my centerfire cans sheerly as preventative care. If you let it build up a lot the longer and harder it is to clean. So pretty much I will return the can to factory new performance every couple of years.

    Unless you shoot A LOT (more than my budget allows) it's not really worth messing with more than once every year or two. I was surprised at how much stuff came out of my Recce 7.

    Also the idea that you can 'blow the stuff out' is not really proven. IE take a dirty 30 cal can and put it on a 5.56 and run it...basically it just won't get any more dirty (but also not any cleaner) while you are running 5.56 through it. It might start breaking loose some carbon, yes, but that's not necessarily a good thing or a good way to approach removing carbon build up.

    Another reason that I can see doing preventative care is if you really neglect your cans carbon chunks can break off or break loose and it could lead to an obstruction and/or baffle strike. It's not saying that will ever happen to most people but again it depends on what and how much of what you shoot. Just a little prevention every other year makes me feel better about myself pretty much sums it up.
    Last edited by alamo5000; 12 January 2021 at 18:34.

  11. #11
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    Good points Alamo. Thanks for the clarification.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by MoxyDave View Post
    Good points Alamo. Thanks for the clarification.
    No problem. Just a different perspective.

    One guy that I was reading his posts took his 30 cal can and had a friend with a 300 RUM. He mounted the can up and shot the crap out of it. According to him the can was puking out carbon for weeks after that. Again, not a good way to approach it due to potential obstructions or whatever.

  13. #13
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    Cool. Thanks moxy and Alamo

    Also 2 different silencer companies head guys have posted regularly to lightly lather on “bore butter” to the baffles prior to shooting rimfire

    I picked up a tube a while back, and man does it smell just like froglube

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by mustangfreek View Post
    Cool. Thanks moxy and Alamo

    Also 2 different silencer companies head guys have posted regularly to lightly lather on “bore butter” to the baffles prior to shooting rimfire

    I picked up a tube a while back, and man does it smell just like froglube
    You can use froglube or seal 1 on your baffles. You can treat them before use and it really does help. Like I said though, just shoot the hell out of it, then drop them in a little bit of C4 over night then tumble. They will come out clean as a whistle with no scrubbing or scraping.

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